No Bank Transfer Day, But There Are Elections: 5 Things to Know for the Week

Simon Zhen

By , Staff Writer
Posted on Mon Nov 5, 2012

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No Bank Transfer Day, But There Are Elections: 5 Things to Know for the Week

Fairfax County / Flickr source

One year ago, consumers were in a state of outrage as banks tried to impose new fees on them. It led to the birth of Bank Transfer Day, which encouraged consumers to transfer their money to credit unions. But, you can vote with your money any time. Now, it’s time to vote for your next president.

  • Monday is the anniversary of Bank Transfer Day, a consumer movement that encouraged bank customers to close their accounts and move their money to credit unions. This year, however, there will be no official Bank Transfer Day. Kristen Christian, the creator of the movement, said she does not want to draw people away from the elections.
  • Speaking of elections, Tuesday is Election Day! The recent storm may have dampened the livelihood of the presidential campaigns, but voting is as important as it has ever been. Remember to vote if you are signed up to do so.
  • Last week, most of the biggest banks in the Northeast have extended fee waivers and financial assistance to customers affected by Hurricane Sandy. Many of the banks are extending their help into the middle of this week. For example, Chase and Citibank will continue to waive overdraft and overdraft-protection transfer fees until Nov. 7. Wells Fargo will waive out-of-network ATM fees until Nov.7.
  • In certain states affected by the storm, the IRS is extending the deadline for individuals and businesses that have to file returns and make quarterly tax payments. The deadline is typically late October but it has been pushed back to Fed. 1, 2013.
  • You might have Angry Birds on your mobile device. Soon, you might have it in your wallet. Rovio, the company behind the popular Angry Birds game, has licensed the brand to a prepaid card company, which plans to launch four Angry-Birds-designed prepaid cards to the U.S. market early next year.
 

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