The economy may be struggling, but tensions are high when it comes to any sort of discussion about improving the financial situation. Obama’s approval rating has been sinking ever since he has been sworn into office, and many Americans are constantly debating the best methods of improving our economy and our country.

Things may not look too promising for our government and its leaders, based on a USA Today/Gallup poll gauging Americans’ approval of five prominent legislative acts that have been passed in the past two years.

The Results

Support for Congressional Legislative Achievements in the Last Two Years

The Financial Reform Bill is the only piece of legislation that had a higher approval rating than a disapproval rating. Gallup proposed that the reason this was the only bill approved by a majority of Americans was the 42% approval rating garnered from the Republicans and the also a majority support from Independents. Approval ratings among Democrats were higher for all five of the legislative acts.

Of all the political moves, Healthcare overhaul and the Economic Stimulus package had the biggest gap in Republican-Democratic voting. Here are the bills in order of political divisiveness from most to least:

Support for Congressional Legislative Achievements in the Last Two Years, by Party ID

The fact that Americans disapproved of four of the five bills showed the divide between the public’s and Congress’ policy programs. In 2009, Congress had an approval rating of 39% but most of this year approval has been around or below 20%. Some speculate it is due to the slow economic growth. Americans are looking for results and their patience with Congress seems to be through.

Here’s what Obama said about the economy this week:

Research Methods

USA Today/Gallup surveyed a random sample of 1,021 individuals aged 18 and older by conducting telephone interviews. They selected the telephone numbers by using random-digit-dial sampling. The samples they used were weighted by gender, age, race, education, region and phone lines. All respondents were living in the continental U.S. and were interviewed between the dates of August 27 and August 30, 2010.

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